Finally Summer!

Good morning, Friends!

Wow, a long Winter’s nap we had!  While I was glad to have gotten an early start to the season tune-up in February, the long, overcast days had me setting aside my motivation for blogging, so here I am, catching up my progress!

With preparation started, Whiskey and I attended the Brandi Lyons Horsemanship clinic, a four day “vacation” to reconnect and push progress further.  I had not been on Whiskey for a year, and, while I live with him at home, our progress got sidelined with Smokey and her progress!

Settling in for clinicDuring tune-up preparation at Angela Tanner’s, a certified Brandi Lyons instructor, Whiskey was taught the hip over for mounting up.  I love this for focus!  He was also started on the lay down.  Horsemanship has evolved over the years to encompass these skills for a well rounded horse and partnership.  These skills are a combination of cues that are taught and then combined.  For example, the lay down starts with the head down cue given in the saddle.  This has taught both Smokey and Whiskey to ride with a loose rein.  Power steering comes from taking up one side or the other rein, using the outside leg with the inside rein for your directional aid.

Another “new” skill is the shoulder over.  Whiskey and I need to work on this for better trot-to-canter transitions on a circle.  He needs this for his Cowboy Dressage, but more importantly, for control of his front end and feet.

Shoulder over starts on the ground after basic bridle work is started, and progresses to the saddle.  Whiskey and I did a lot of this in clinic.

As mentioned, while Whiskey is a seasoned show horse, it seemed to be a trigger to be at a “new” arena!  He was quite ramped up at the start of the clinic!  And to be fair, I had not taken him anywhere for a year, except for Angela Tanner’s facility, where he had a chance to relax in the new environment!  My goal is to have him be relaxed no matter where we may find ourselves!

Because of his excitement, I remained on the ground doing bridlework for warm-up on Day One of the clinic.  Everyone else was mounted up, even though their horses were also displaying signs of being somewhere new!  However, I saw no need to be in the saddle until things calmed down and we could be better focused!

After observing everyone, Brandi had a few words for each of us.  She very graciously complemented me in staying on the ground under the “pressure” of everyone else being mounted.  I’m willing to do what my horse needs and seems appropriate at any given moment.  We all have to deal with the horse that presents right here, right now!  By the end of the day, I was in the saddle and we were on our way!

Terri

 

Save

Save

Save

Save

Did you like this? Share it:

Smokey’s Cloud

Good morning, Friends!

img_2071 My philosophy with regards to buying and selling horses, is, for one, no one takes advantage of you without your permission.  Two, in the world of used cars and used horses, it’s buyer beware.  Three, in light of that, I strive to do business word of mouth, to defray some of that risk.  I’ve had good luck with that in my thirty years of being involved with horses.  Four, before I sell a horse, I do the work to make sure the horse is consistent for me, plugging holes in training, getting help to do that if I need it, and riding it enough to know what I have so I can fairly represent the horse to it’s new owner.

Smokey was sold to me as a trail ready horse, but not a kids horse.  That when the owner wanted a “chill ride”, Smokey would be used.

My experience, once I started working with her, and wanting to ride, was that I have nothing more than a green-broke horse here.  I have not had a horse this green in twenty years.  We had no communication skills between us.  When I rode her, either in the arena, and the time I took her out, she expressed her crabbiness, lack of motivation I call it when asked to do something, by going fast, and she had no stop.  She acted thick headed and hard necked and wanted to do what she wanted.

img_2107The previous owner rode her with a twisted snaffle, which in my quick and easy reference, pictured, page 47, is listed as a bit of Last Resort; “There are a few bits which come under the general heading of the snaffle, but which could never be described as mild, even in the most skilled hands.  The twisted snaffle, once commonplace but now rarely seen, is one of them; perhaps a skilled rider can use one without inflicting damage, but such skill is rare and the twisted snaffle should come into the category of ‘not for general use’.”

img_1957I moved her with arena work, immediately into the Confidence Snaffle as sold on the Parelli.com website.  This is a Korsteel brand, and can be found on other sites.  This is one of the mildest snaffles, it still took Smokey quite a while to relax into the bit.

I now ride her with a Myler combination bit with a C3 mouthpiece, she is doing fantastic with it, and our recent work with clinician Angela Tanner in Newport, Washington has us riding on a loose rein.

This bit is also marketed by Parelli.com as the Cradle Bridle, however, it is available on other sites.  All my horses have loved this bit after progressing from a snaffle bit tune-up.  I’ve been using this bit for about eight years.

So now, not only am I dealing with a green broke horse, but one that has been started with ignorance and abuse with equipment, and inconsistent handling, in my opinion.

So I percolated on what I could do to remedy Smokey’s and my situation.  With a referral and reference from my good friend Robin,  I enrolled in an accelerated clinic of Angela Tanner’s, with the goal of finding and addressing Smokey’s needs, through working on foundation training.  Here is a link to her Facebook page:

https://www.facebook.com/hoovesof.mercy?fref=ts

https://www.facebook.com/EquineHeadStart/?fref=ts

Certified Trainers

The first couple weeks were pretty rough.  I seriously thought I would sell her to someone who had the time to continue her education.  IF she had sufficient trail experience, I might be seeing the worst of her now, since there was nothing instilled in her except a lot of resistance.

Smokey must have read my mind.  The third week we turned a corner and it started getting better.  You’ve been following my blog, so you can see that.

My point is, when you choose to have a horse, let’s give it the best life we can.  Be fair of what you ask, and get some education for you and your horse, I think that is a minimum.  Too many people have horses that never bother to step up their game.  The life of a horse can be quite sad, even in the hands of people who say they care.

There are many ways to rescue a horse.  Smokey is my $3,500.00 rescue.

I’m sixty-two years old, what do I want with a green horse with minimal experience and no skills?  However, I have started her, we have turned a corner, it will likely take some time, more than I anticipated, but I have the support of a great trainer, both human and horse, in Angela Tanner, and wonderful, supportive friends, that will help me work through it and accomplish success.  I know they all join up, Smokey is not one-hundred percent, however, I feel we will make it.

My next blog entry will be on Smokey’s silver lining, because every cloud has one, right?

Terri

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Did you like this? Share it: