Touching Noses With Elvis

img_2198Good morning, Friends!  First snow!

img_2116An update on Elvis!  Our interaction progresses.

img_2109I continue to give him Ttouches, and rubs all over, touching under the belly, down the butt, front and back of legs and reaching up towards the ears, which he is a little shy still.

img_2114I’ve taken his rope halter and rubbed it all over him.

img_2153 Very good with that.  I’ve introduced the grooming brush.  He’s good with that.

img_2142When I hang out with non-demanding time, building some of that in so I’m not asking anything of him every time, he says hello with his nose, once, maybe twice.

img_2204When I feed pans through the fence, he sticks his face through and blows on my neck.  I’m in love!

img_2165When I brought Smokey home from clinic, he stayed at the gate and hung there for a few minutes!  Smokey had ambled off.

img_2119It’s gratifying to see the small and steady improvements and his interaction growing!

img_2207I have a soft and short “get down” rope that I played with him yesterday, rubbing him with it, putting it around his neck, just played for a few minutes.  I ordered a size up on a halter and am waiting for delivery.  I use a lot of approach and retreat, and I love on Smokey and Whiskey for good examples.

img_2164I look forward to progressing, it is a fun and gratifying journey!  I hope you are enjoying it as much as I am!

Terri

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A Week of Ttouch

Good morning, Friends!

img_2150I give everyone some Ttouch every time I go out to intereact with the horses.  Ttouch was developed by Linda Tellington-Jones.  I have a couple of the older books, her newer one, The Ultimate Horse Behavior and Training Book is wonderful and I like the way it is organized.  It has a forward by John Lyons.  You can explore more of this concept and practice here on her website:

http://www.ttouch.com

Today, for Elvis, Clouded Leopard on shoulder and back, strokes on neck, front and back of front legs.  Abalone Ttouch on the butt.  Touching a different part each day.  Today was back of front legs, which brought his head around, belly, and butt.

img_2149For Smokey, Clouded Leopard on shoulder and back, Lick of the Cow on girth, Abalone Ttouch on butt.  Checked for tight tail.  I’ve done Tarantulas Pulling the Plow the other day.

img_2097For Whiskey, Clouded Leopard on shoulder and back, Lick of the Cow on girth.  I finish all with Noah’s March, which puts the finishing touch, and integration, on a horse at the end of the session.

img_2110All received strokes on the neck where the carotid artery sits.

Clouded Leopard, Lick of the Cow, Abalone, Belly Lifts, and Tarantulas Pulling the Plow are my mainstay of Ttouches.  I always end with Noah’s March to finish and integrate.  I use Hoof Tapping and Neck Rocking as needed.  I also give Belly Lifts.

Does this sound like a foreign language to you?  Check it out!  Our community brought Practitioner Debra Potts to teach us, give us Centered Riding lessons, and help with saddle fit.

The Abalone, Connected Circles, and Lick of the Cow’s Tongue are for trust.  Belly Lifts, Clouded Leopard, Hoof Tapping, Neck Rocking, Noah’s March, and Tarantulas Pulling the Plow are Ttouches for Awareness.

I like blending it in my grooming routine, or non-demanding time.  I like to do Connected Circles along the topline after riding to see if there are any reactions, discomfort, caving,  to a saddle fitting poorly.

Ttouch was emphasized in the endurance riding world when I dabbled, in the late 80’s, early 90’s.  It was, and still is, a way to release discomfort, in the horse’s body.  Tail work helps to ease fear.  A way to give back to the horse giving touches that can only be done by you, their partner!

How do you like to “give back” to your buddy?  I’d love to know!

Terri

 

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A Challenge For Smokey

Good morning, Friends!

img_1993One of Smokey’s major “holes” or task in need of tune-up, was mounting up from the mounting block.  When she wanted to move her feet, or move off from the block while I wanted to mount up, I moved her a little away, bridle work, disengage, back, and a head down cue, then back to the mounting block to rest, and basically ground tie.

She caught on to ground tying quickly.  It isn’t about the mounting block.  It’s about standing quietly anywhere I ask her.  These things, while giving a chance to learn, cannot be compromised on.  I’ve had horses, that, if they move one of their feet, and you don’t notice, and ask them to give it back (reverse that motion), then they have won!

Every day in clinic, it would take a dozen times up to the mounting block, sometimes resting, relaxing, nothing being asked, and then going to mount up.  My persistence had to outlast her resistance.

Teaching Smokey the hip over helped a lot, I felt.  It gave her a different focus, a clean focus, without past resistance issues, to prepare for me to mount up.  I used the hip over to mount up in the outside arena.  The last day I walked her over to the mounting block, stepped up, and did a combination of forward cue and hip over, and mounted up without delay.

I’m been guilty of not giving these issues much thought.  If someone wants to hold your horse for you while you mount, how will you do it by yourself?  I like to present myself as a self-sufficient rider when I go somewhere with my horse.  If you hold your horse, and bring the mounting block to your horse, they are similarly not learning anything, not learning the process.  Stumps and logs don’t move in the woods when trail riding.  These short cuts only short our partnership with our horse for working together!

Here is a short video on the hip over exercise.  I posted it in a previous entry.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=shRdOFinyMY&feature=youtu.be

How are you fine tuning your partner?  I’d love to hear!

Terri

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Smokey’s Silver Lining!

Good Evening, Friends!

Thought you might enjoy a quick catch up on Smokey’s progress, going forward!

14702501_1245484572139033_3138255733801437839_nOne of the first things achieved in clinic, was Smokey self loading into the trailer.  This was accomplished with the forward cue, which we use during bridlework warm up.  She caught on to this quite quickly.  Later, we had opportunity to give her a load up, tie, and back out.  I’ll work on that going forward.  I always enjoy having some follow-up goals to work on.

The next major achievement was an emergency one rein stop with disengagement.  We were shown in the following manner, which is a little different in how I’ve learned it in the past, but things do evolve, rider biomechanics has shown us that!

First, develop it on the ground.  It should be automatic when asked.  It should be clean and snappy, not sloppy.  I never gave it much thought, having horses that have been able to do it quite easily.  Smokey could not do it, so she required a bit of practice.  It is not the easiest thing for a gaited horse to do, but she should still have it instilled as a habit.

I used to bring my rein to my knee or waist.  Now I bring it to my belt buckle.  Sit tall and centered, leaning a little back.  Beware of any tilt to the side.  Have your left rein loose and your left hand on the swell of the saddle.  Bring the right rein up to the belt buckle, at the same time giving the right leg towards the hindquarter, asking for a disengagement to the left, as you look towards the back, seeing and feeling when it happens.

Here is a brief video of establishing this on the ground during bridlework.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1RREg-stc-0&feature=youtu.be

I practice it enough for Smokey to give it softly.

Summing up Smokey’s and my work and achievements, are as follows:

  • bridle work from the ground to work on saddle skills, disengagement, and head down cue
  • mounting from the block
  • standing still for mounting up
  • standing still after mounting up until asked to move out
  • shoulder work, as in shoulder over, done on a circle, serpentine exercises, the start of backing in a circle
  • head down cue, leading to loose rein riding, including moving out on a loose rein, and stopping on a loose rein.
  • power steering, incorporating loose rein riding, lifting rein one side or the other for direction, then giving release, riding straight.  Work this with leg cue.
  • practicing learned skills in different environments, with the outdoor arena, and two outings to an extensive trail obstacle course.
  • starting liberty work, with a stay, come-to-me cue, playing and progressing
  • leading exercise to have Smokey stay behind me for trail riding skills
  • hip over cue to enable many situations, including mounting up
  • ground tying for as long as I want
  • roll back along the rail for teaching, and keyhole game for practice
  • de-spooking with various stuff

For the future, Smokey’s trail skills will be assessed.  These newly learned skills from our clinic, will be worked on and reinforced for them to become habit, for both of us!

What are you plans going forward for you and your buddy?  I’d love to know!

Terri

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Smokey’s Cloud

Good morning, Friends!

img_2071 My philosophy with regards to buying and selling horses, is, for one, no one takes advantage of you without your permission.  Two, in the world of used cars and used horses, it’s buyer beware.  Three, in light of that, I strive to do business word of mouth, to defray some of that risk.  I’ve had good luck with that in my thirty years of being involved with horses.  Four, before I sell a horse, I do the work to make sure the horse is consistent for me, plugging holes in training, getting help to do that if I need it, and riding it enough to know what I have so I can fairly represent the horse to it’s new owner.

Smokey was sold to me as a trail ready horse, but not a kids horse.  That when the owner wanted a “chill ride”, Smokey would be used.

My experience, once I started working with her, and wanting to ride, was that I have nothing more than a green-broke horse here.  I have not had a horse this green in twenty years.  We had no communication skills between us.  When I rode her, either in the arena, and the time I took her out, she expressed her crabbiness, lack of motivation I call it when asked to do something, by going fast, and she had no stop.  She acted thick headed and hard necked and wanted to do what she wanted.

img_2107The previous owner rode her with a twisted snaffle, which in my quick and easy reference, pictured, page 47, is listed as a bit of Last Resort; “There are a few bits which come under the general heading of the snaffle, but which could never be described as mild, even in the most skilled hands.  The twisted snaffle, once commonplace but now rarely seen, is one of them; perhaps a skilled rider can use one without inflicting damage, but such skill is rare and the twisted snaffle should come into the category of ‘not for general use’.”

img_1957I moved her with arena work, immediately into the Confidence Snaffle as sold on the Parelli.com website.  This is a Korsteel brand, and can be found on other sites.  This is one of the mildest snaffles, it still took Smokey quite a while to relax into the bit.

I now ride her with a Myler combination bit with a C3 mouthpiece, she is doing fantastic with it, and our recent work with clinician Angela Tanner in Newport, Washington has us riding on a loose rein.

This bit is also marketed by Parelli.com as the Cradle Bridle, however, it is available on other sites.  All my horses have loved this bit after progressing from a snaffle bit tune-up.  I’ve been using this bit for about eight years.

So now, not only am I dealing with a green broke horse, but one that has been started with ignorance and abuse with equipment, and inconsistent handling, in my opinion.

So I percolated on what I could do to remedy Smokey’s and my situation.  With a referral and reference from my good friend Robin,  I enrolled in an accelerated clinic of Angela Tanner’s, with the goal of finding and addressing Smokey’s needs, through working on foundation training.  Here is a link to her Facebook page:

https://www.facebook.com/hoovesof.mercy?fref=ts

https://www.facebook.com/EquineHeadStart/?fref=ts

Certified Trainers

The first couple weeks were pretty rough.  I seriously thought I would sell her to someone who had the time to continue her education.  IF she had sufficient trail experience, I might be seeing the worst of her now, since there was nothing instilled in her except a lot of resistance.

Smokey must have read my mind.  The third week we turned a corner and it started getting better.  You’ve been following my blog, so you can see that.

My point is, when you choose to have a horse, let’s give it the best life we can.  Be fair of what you ask, and get some education for you and your horse, I think that is a minimum.  Too many people have horses that never bother to step up their game.  The life of a horse can be quite sad, even in the hands of people who say they care.

There are many ways to rescue a horse.  Smokey is my $3,500.00 rescue.

I’m sixty-two years old, what do I want with a green horse with minimal experience and no skills?  However, I have started her, we have turned a corner, it will likely take some time, more than I anticipated, but I have the support of a great trainer, both human and horse, in Angela Tanner, and wonderful, supportive friends, that will help me work through it and accomplish success.  I know they all join up, Smokey is not one-hundred percent, however, I feel we will make it.

My next blog entry will be on Smokey’s silver lining, because every cloud has one, right?

Terri

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Nosey with Elvis

This is a stream of observations and actions from the last week!

img_2098Tonight, as I hung out with the horses, sitting on the edge of the feed bin with Elvis, he stuck his nose towards me and touched me!  He is developing some curiosity towards me and inviting me in!

img_2085He is doing great with the hands on when I go out to feed twice a day.  I give them all scratches and a little grooming, then it is Elvis’ turn, so he can get into the routine.  He is really doing well, standing for me while I stroke him all over, and thus far, down his front legs.

This morning he came over to say hello before going to his hay!

img_2101This evening, Elvis came over to check me out, seeing what I was doing with my rake, cleaning up!  I walked along with him, scratching and stroking, down his front legs, and allowing him to check out my extended hand, he was exploring!

He was happy to hang out with Smokey, since she returned this evening from being in clinic.

img_2097I started Ttouch with him, gave him his first basic circles!  Here is a link that will tell you about it!  I’ve been doing this for years on my horses, on myself also, from the beginning!

http://www.ttouch.com

Tellington Touch was my first training and experience with groundwork, and things like my space-your space.  Practitioners held clinics where we learned the Touches, and they also gave Centered Riding lessons and helped with saddle fit.

img_2100Today I repeated the Ttouch circles, along his back, and on his shoulder, then blending it all together!

I give Smokey the basic circles and lick of the cow’s tongue.  I give Whiskey basic connected circles.

I love the progress!  I’d love to hear your thoughts!  You can comment below!

Terri

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Report Card With Smokey

img_2069The week started out back at the arena.  This was our last week of three days.  A little silliness with the mounting block, but still an improvement.  Asking for the hip over, I felt her teeth on my arm, she got yelled at and a smack for her trouble!  After that, mounted up, stood still, rode on loose rein, reviewed head down cue, which builds the loose rein technique.  Dismounted, checked cinch and tightened, mounted back up without incidence.  Gaining some self sufficiency!

img_2072We started playing with some starting techniques to have our horse “come to me” first on the lead, and then without.  Smokey thought she could stretch her neck to me without moving her feet forward to play the game, haha!

img_2081We had another session at the obstacle course today, an opportunity for sunshine, even though chilly, our work kept us busy!  I did this session in-hand, practicing our leading exercises, keeping her back of me, like I want her on the trail if I feel the need to lead.

img_2084We had practice with the enclosure hung with noodles, that generated some curiosity, ground poles, umbrella, moved out of the arena to the trench and bridge platform, over logs, straddling and stopping for mounting, tree limb piles, boughs that got brushed along her sides, a log pile to pick her way through, a trail bordered by logs to go forward and backward, a campfire to check out, some flag waving, pulling a wagon, as you would a log, the car wash hanging strips!

Smokey received some practice loading up, tying, and then backing out of the trailer!

15078693_1351512981555407_5638419452387703885_nOur last day saw some de-sensitizing with some big balls, bags of empty plastic bottles, some boxes, that packing material that snaps, crackles, and pops!  I didn’t see anything that bothered Smokey.  We then learned and practiced roll backs, and put that to use with the keyhole game!  This day Smokey and I were coached at the mounting block to use small steps forward and the hip over, she was very responsive!

15055766_1351513091555396_3949547758171039315_nWe learned a lot, and together!  It was a great learning environment, and I’m grateful for having more tools of communication!

How have you been filling your toolbox?  I’d love to know!

Terri

You can catch a short video here of the keyhole game!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5x8fVeFtlqg

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Connecting With Elvis

img_2047Every day I interact with Elvis.  He is still rather odd man out, with Smokey tolerating him more than Whiskey.  He is self possessed and self sufficient.  He lines up to get  his treat pan with Smokey and Whiskey.  He follows me over to the hay flakes that I’m disbursing so everyone can find one for themselves.

img_2031He is showing curiosity with the wheelbarrow as I clean up.  He is having moments of connection with me, looking directly at me and approaching with curiosity.  He has allowed me to touch him momentarily on his face, under his chin, neck, and sides!

img_2058Today I was sitting with him as he ate breakfast, and he allowed my hand all over!  He has a good winter coat, soft as you might imagine baby hair to be!  I sat with him approximately fifteen minutes, scratching his withers, stroking his neck, shoulder, side, back, and down his left front leg.  I walked around him, touching his butt, and gave attention to his right side.

img_2053As I was sitting on the edge of the feed bin, he was very comfortable being really close, and even shifted his feet and body a little closer!  Elvis is not receiving any tactile interaction from either Smokey or Whiskey.  He is seeming to now know that he receives that from me.

img_2003This was a first today for hanging out with non-demanding time to include friendly time also!  It was exciting and gratifying!

Here is a link to a brief, about one minute, video, that shows how comfortable he has gotten.  I’m so pleased!

Terri

https://youtu.be/KBHLQzr6E4s

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Week Ending With Smokey

img_1997Our last day of the week saw continued consistency and a variety of work and demonstrations.  The weather was beautiful to be in the outside arena!

Smokey is doing great with her warm-up of bridle work and hip over.  We had a demonstration of the sit down, and the lay down from the ground, as opposed to asking from the saddle.  During this time, Smokey ground tied, never moving a step!

The pattern I practiced today was the box.  It’s challenging, I can become addled!  The goal is to become soft and fluid with your horse.  We have improved!  It was a real tug-of-war at first!  Poor Smokey!

img_2011Start in the middle, going counterclockwise around the cone.  Head toward a corner and go around that cone clockwise.  Come back in for a counter direction in the middle.  Go out to the next corner cone and to clockwise direction, and so on.  Then reverse direction!  Use inside leg, inside rein and alternate with outside rein and leg.  It really takes coordination!  It’s nice to have had some improvement from the previous week!

We also did some loose rein walking and gaited walking, practicing our power steering!

We finished up outside, with all the outside distractions of the busy corner intersection on the highway, with horses across the street and in the next pasture, and some spots of mud and puddles.  We did not do any speedwork.  We did bridle work through the mud and puddles.  Smokey was not too sure about that but did accept it.  I took her over to the mounting block, I asked for a hip over, she gave it, and I mounted right up, first time!  Lovely!  We rode on a loose rein!

I wish for you such an ending for your week!

We are off for a week and then resume for a last three days!

Terri

Here is the link for the hip over exercise.  The goal is to slap your leg once or twice to have them move the hip, making it easier for you mount up, whether from a block, log, or fence.  Take a look!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=shRdOFinyMY&feature=youtu.be

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Breakthrough With Smokey

Good morning, Friends!

img_1996Smokey and I had a breakthrough on Wednesday!

We continued to show willingness and cooperation for her lessons on bridle work and hip over warm up.  Still showing improvement on the mounting block resting spot and mounting up.  We did the ten meter circle with shoulder out and light on the mouth.

We were shown the head down cue from the saddle.  Keeping Smokey on a small circle, and doing one side, the right side, I milked the rein giving her relief when she dropped her head.  The left rein I left alone, again, no pulling back on the right rein, no crossing over, leaving the left rein at the withers.

We did that for a bit, and when she was getting it, went to the ten meter circle, and on a loose rein, totally loose, asked for a gaited walk.  All I did was raise one rein to adjust if I needed, rather like power steering!

Smokey was head down, so soft, responsive and happy!  I could feel it thru the reins!  With this, I also ask to move out on a totally loose rein.  She is not really sure about that, so I squeeze her up a little.  I also ask her to stop on a loose rein, she again is not quite sure, if I need to repeat, then I ask her for a back, and she dips her head softly and gives it.

We are also getting sacked out to other horses working, which has never bothered us, one of the students throwing her rope, the tractor bringing in shavings, a former student dropped by and had her dog (on a leash), and another lady came to video!  Always something new going on, good for horse and rider!

What is a recent breakthrough for you?  I’d love to hear!

Terri

Here’s a link to that video on my loose rein riding exercise.  It is only about four minutes, take a look!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b0dRIBTLhQs&feature=youtu.be

 

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